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Mental Health

SIX HEALTH PROBLEMS MEN SHOULD NOT IGNORE


British men are paying the price for neglecting their health: more than 100,000 men a year die prematurely.

Below are Six important health issues for men and the symptoms you should never ignore.
 

Heart Disease

 

The most common symptoms of coronary heart disease (CHD) are chest pain (angina) and a heart attack.

You can also experience other symptoms, such as heart palpitations and unusual breathlessness. In some cases, people may not have any symptoms before they are diagnosed.

Angina

If your coronary arteries become partially blocked, it can cause chest pain (angina).

This can be a mild, uncomfortable feeling similar to indigestion. However, a severe angina attack can cause a painful feeling of heaviness or tightness, usually in the centre of the chest, which may spread to the arms, neck, jaw, back or stomach.

Angina is often triggered by physical activity or stressful situations. Symptoms usually pass in less than 10 minutes, and can be relieved by resting or using a nitrate tablet or spray.

Read more about treating angina.

Heart attacks

If your arteries become completely blocked, it can cause a heart attack (myocardial infarction).

Heart attacks can permanently damage the heart muscle and, if not treated straight away, can be fatal.

Dial 999 for immediate medical assistence if you think you're having a heart attack.

Although symptoms can vary, the discomfort or pain of a heart attack is usually similar to that of angina, but it's often more severe.

During a heart attack, you may also experience the following symptoms:

pain in other parts of the body - it can feel as if the pain is travelling from your chest to your arms, jaw, neck, back and abdomen

lightheadedness

sweating

nausea

breathlessness

For more information see the NHS website below:

Coronary heart disease

 


A lump on your testicle


Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men aged 20 to 35. Nearly 2,000 men are diagnosed with testicular cancer each year in the UK.


If you notice a lump or abnormality in your testicles, first see your GP. Most testicular lumps are not cancer, but it is essential to have any abnormalities checked. This is because treatment for testicular cancer is much more effective if the cancer is diagnosed early.


Find out what your testicles should look and feel like.


Early diagnosis meant that footballer Neil Harris beat testicular cancer and soon returned to play for Millwall FC.


Watch a video on testicular cancer.


Read more on testicular cancer, including symptoms and treatment.


Find out more in testicular lumps and swellings

Moles


Check your moles regularly and be aware of any change in colour or shape, or if they start bleeding. Most changes are harmless and are due to a non-cancerous increase of pigment cells in the skin.


Could you have a cancerous mole and not know it? Use our mole assessment to find out.


Read more information about moles.


Feeling depressed


If you’re depressed, you may lose interest in things you used to enjoy. If you’ve been having feelings of extreme sadness, contact your GP.


Depression is a real illness with real effects on your work, social and family life. Treatment usually involves a combination of self help, talking therapies and drugs.


Depression is more common in women, but men are far more likely to commit suicide. This may be because men are more reluctant to seek help.  


Financial stress: job insecurity, redundancy and debt can all affect your mental wellbeing. Find out when to seek help.


Learn more about depression, including how it is diagnosed and treated.


Read about living with depression.

 

Trouble urinating


When the prostate is enlarged, it can press on the tube that carries urine from the bladder. This can make it hard to pass urine, which can be a sign of prostate disease, including cancer.


Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK. More than 30,000 men are diagnosed with it every year. Other symptoms include pain or burning when you pass urine and frequently waking up in the night to pee. If you have any of these symptoms, see your GP.  



Every man has a prostate gland and it’s crucial to your sex life. Get to know your prostate and what can go wrong with it.


Watch a video on prostate cancer.


Read about prostate cancer, including the symptoms and how it is treated.


Impotence


Most men have problems getting or keeping an erection (impotence) at some point. See your GP if your erection problems last for several weeks.


Your GP is likely to assess your general health because impotence, also known as erectile dysfunction, can be a sign of more serious conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes or high blood pressure.


Half of all men over 40 have had trouble getting an erection at least once. Read about the causes of impotence and where to get help.


Watch a video on erectile dysfunction.


Find out more about impotence.


For more information please see the links below:

Men's Health

Five Health Symptoms Men should not ignore

 

 



 
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